Arnold Schwarzenegger — actor, weight lifter and former two-term governor of California — is regular to be in Denver on Saturday to support the two redistricting initiatives on Colorado’s November ballot.

Amendments Y and Z would put control of legislature redistricting — the process of creating new districts once a decade after the U.S. Census — in the hands of a 12-member commission that would be made up four Republicans, four Democrats and four independent voters. Commission members would be picked through a combination of a lottery system and a panel of retired judges.

Schwarzenegger, who served as California governor from 2003 to 2011, has long been opposed to gerrymandering.

He is regular to appear from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday at the “Terminate Gerrymandering Rally and Taligate” on the University of Denver’s field Green. The rally is free and open to the public.

Next Saturday, the governator will do a tailgate rally at Michigan State and then fly to Colorado to push redistricting reform, writes @isaacdovere: https://t.co/UzUBLs7urO

— The Atlantic (@TheAtlantic) October 14, 2018

A story published Sunday in The Atlantic, by Edward Issac-Dovere, reports that Schwarzenegger, best-known in some fan and political circles as the Governator, will take a break from cinematography a new “Terminator” film in Budapest and fly to Michigan for a rally in support of Michigan Proposal 2, before spouting on to Colorado to support Amendments Y and Z.

Related Articles

  • What’s Colorado Amendment Y: legislature redistricting change
  • What’s Colorado Amendment Z: State legislative redistricting change
  • Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018 letters: Election appeals on transportation, setbacks and redistricting; marijuana industry; a local hero
  • How Colorado draws its vote maps would change if Amendments Y and Z are approved
  • Guest Commentary: Amendments Y and Z put the interests of Colorado — not political insiders — at the forefront of redistricting

The regular appearances are “part of his continued mission to end partisan gerrymandering,” according to The Atlantic story.